News

How HIV spreads from DCs
Enlarge image

ResearchSpainSwitzerlandGermany

How HIV spreads from DCs

20.12.2012 - Spanish researchers have unraveled how HIV disperses throughout the body – and can block the process before it occurs.

In a previous publication with Swiss and German virologists, researchers headed by Nuria Izquierdo-Useros from the AIDS Research Institute IrsiCaixa in Barcelona discovered that the HI virus uses specific membrane lipids called gangliosides on their surface to enter dendritic cells (DCs) by modifying membrane fluidity. Based on these findings, they tried to make the DC’s membrane more rigid by using a dihydroceramide desaturase (Des-1) blocker, which they have filed for patent. The new approach seems promising because HIV has first to enter DCs to be passed to their target cells, the CD4 T lymphocytes, in a process termed trans-infection. Now, the Spanish team has identified the molecule on the surface of DCs that recognises and binds the gangliosides and allows HIV to be taken up by dendritic cells and transmitted to CD4 cells. The new study is published in the open access journal PLOS Biology.

In order to identify the precise molecule located on the membrane of the dendritic cells capable of capturing HIV, the researchers studied one family of proteins that are present on the surface of these cells, called Siglecs. It is known that these proteins bind to the gangliosides on the HIV surface. In the laboratory, they mixed the virus with dendritic cells that displayed different quantities of Siglec-1, and found that a higher quantity of Siglec-1 led to those dendritic cells capturing more HIV, which in turn allowed for enhanced transmission of HIV to CD4 T lymphocytes, a process called trans-infection.

The team then tried inhibiting the Siglec-1 protein. They found that the dendritic cells lost their capacity to capture HIV and, importantly, they also lost their ability to transfer HIV to CD4 T lymphocytes. With all these data, the scientists concluded that Siglec-1 is the molecule responsible for HIV entrance into the dendritic cells, and could therefore become a new therapeutic target. "We had the key and now we have found a lock," explains Javier Martínez-Picado. "Now we are already working on the development of a drug that could block this process to improve the efficacy of the current existing treatments against AIDS".

© eurobiotechnews.eu/tg

http://www.european-biotechnology-news.com/news/news/2012-04/how-hiv-spreads-from-dcs.html

BusinessUK

20.08.2014 Biopharmaceutical contract manufacturer Fujifilm Diosynth Biotechnologies is expanding its cell culture manufacturing capacity further with a new 2,000l single-use bioreactor at the company’s site in Billingham, UK.

BusinessEUGermanyUK

15.08.2014 Some of Europe’s biggest pharma companies are competing in a bidding war for US biotech Intermune Inc., Bloomberg reports, citing insider reports as the source.

ResearchEUGermanyUK

13.08.2014 The Ebola epidemic is still raging on in West Africa and thus far there is

neither vaccine nor cure for the viral disease. The only flickers of hope:

an experimental antibody serum and an early-stage vaccine.

BusinessFrance

11.08.2014 Will Sanofi succeed where Pfizer failed? The French pharmaceutical company has taken on the commercialisation of Mannkind Corporation’s inhaled insulin product Afrezza.

ResearchSwedenGermany

08.08.2014 Boehringer Ingelheim is walking away from Swedish Orexo's prostaglandin inhibition project OX-MPI. Germany's largest researching pharmaceutical company had been responsible for the project's research and development since 2005.

ResearchSwitzerlandDenmark

06.08.2014 Roche is re-expanding its involvement in RNAi technologies. The Swiss pharmaceutical company will pay up to €335m for the acquisition of the Danish company Santaris Pharma A/S.

ResearchUKSwitzerland

03.08.2014 In its efforts to become the leading country in genetic research, the UK has attracted investments worth more than £300m (€376m) to map 100,000 human genomes by 2017.

BusinessSpainUKSweden

31.07.2014 Astrazeneca is buying the rights to Almirall’s respiratory drugs in a deal worth up to €1.56bn.

BusinessFranceGermanySwitzerlandUK

30.07.2014 Rumours have it that French Danone wants to sell its medical nutrition business to US drugmaker Hospira for US$5bn in yet another tax inversion deal.

Events

All Events

Current issue

All issues

Product of the week

Products

Stock list

All quotes

TOP

  • SANTHERA80.00 CHF6.74%
  • WILEX2.26 EUR1.80%
  • ADDEX4.07 CHF1.75%

FLOP

  • MOLOGEN7.30 EUR-6.41%
  • 4SC1.16 EUR-3.33%
  • EVOLVA1.27 CHF-2.31%

TOP

  • MAGFORCE6.47 EUR19.8%
  • SANTHERA80.00 CHF15.1%
  • LONZA101.50 CHF9.7%

FLOP

  • WILEX2.26 EUR-31.1%
  • MOLOGEN7.30 EUR-22.8%
  • VITA 343.79 EUR-19.9%

TOP

  • SANTHERA80.00 CHF3802.4%
  • CO.DON2.50 EUR228.9%
  • PAION2.41 EUR186.9%

FLOP

  • CYTOS0.27 CHF-93.3%
  • MEDIGENE4.60 EUR-66.4%
  • THERAMETRICS0.08 CHF-46.7%

No liability assumed, Date: 20.08.2014